Directory Information
|
Maps/Directions
|
Site Index
|
WebCam





Academic Calendar
Class Schedules
Degree Requirements
Course Descriptions
Registration
Financial Information
Student Life
Academic Policies
Catalog Home

Registrar's Office
Financial Aid
Admissions
Tri-College University
Bookstore
Concordia Home

Past Catalogs
2006-07
2004-06
2001-03
1999-2001
1997-99
cat_sub1

2007-08 Academic Catalog

Courses

Biology

BIOL 101 — General Biology, 1.0 credit. E.
An examination of the basic concepts of biology and the ways in which biologists ask and answer questions; practical applications of important biological discoveries and their relationships to public issues. Designed for non-majors. Three lectures and four hours of laboratory per week.

BIOL 121 — Vertebrate Biology, 1.0 credit. E.
Vertebrate anatomy and physiology, with special emphasis on humans. The course is used as a preparation for upper-level biology courses. Three lectures and four hours of laboratory per week.

BIOL 122 — Evolution and Diversity, 1.0 credit. E.

An introduction to major concepts of biology including evolutionary theories and ecological theories. The diversity of life on earth, excluding the vertebrates of the animal kingdom, is then explored in light of these concepts. Three lectures
and four hours of laboratory per week.
Prerequisite: BIOL 121 — Vertebrate Biology or permission of the instructor

BIOL 152, CHEM 152 — Vocation and the Health Professions, 0.25 credit. E2.
Intended for freshmen and sophomore students interested in various careers in the health professions. This course offers a balance of personal reflection and practical information. The concept of “vocation as calling” will be emphasized and students will be asked to reflect upon their reasons for choosing a particular career path. Practical information will include various career options in the health professions, undergraduate expectations, professional school admissions requirements, and non- traditional career paths.

BIOL 221 — Ecology, 1.0 credit. E1.
Covers the basic principles of energy and nutrient movement through the ecosystems, the forces that structure ecosystems, and the interactions between organisms and the environment and each other. This course emphasizes quantitative skills. Two lectures and four hours of laboratory per week.
Prerequisites: BIOL 121 — Vertebrate Biology, BIOL 122 — Evolution and Diversity;
co-or prerequisite: CHEM 127 — General Chemistry I

BIOL 222 — Genetics and Molecular Biology, 1.0 credit. E2.
A study of classical genetics, gene structure, and mechanisms of gene expression. This course is writing intensive. Model systems commonly used in molecular genetic research are used in labs. Three lectures and four hours of laboratory per week.
Prerequisites: BIOL 121 — Vertebrate Biology, BIOL 122 — Evolution and Diversity, BIOL 221 — Ecology, CHEM 127 — General Chemistry I;
co-or prerequisite: CHEM 128 — General Chemistry II


BIOL 224 — Plant Biology, 1.0 credit. D.

An examination of the structure, function and evolution in green plants, with emphasis placed on seed plants. Three lectures and three hours of laboratory per week.
Prerequisites: BIOL 121 — Vertebrate Biology and BIOL 122 — Evolution and Diversity

BIOL 250 — Pre-May Seminar, 0.25 credit. D.  

BIOL 300 — May Seminar, 1.0 credit. MS.

BIOL 303 — Biomedical Ethics, 1.0 credit. E2.

Examination of contemporary issues in biomedicine from the perspective of several disciplines, including biology, medicine, ethics, sociology and economics. The course satisfies the integration requirement for graduation, but does not count toward the biology
major or minor.
Prerequisite: one course credit in biology

BIOL 305 — Ecology and Field Biology, 1.0 credit. S.
An examination of the basic principles of ecology with extensive field investigation of numerous types of ecosystems. Offered only in summer sessions.
Prerequisites: BIOL 121 — Vertebrate Biology, BIOL 122 — Evolution and Diversity, BIOL 221 — Ecology, and BIOL 222 — Genetics and Molecular

Biology BIOL 306 — Human Anatomy and Physiology, 1.0 credit. E2.
This course, which focuses on the structure and functions of human organ systems and includes examination of human cadavers, is recommended for majors and minors in physical education and for students preparing for allied health professions. It is also open to biology majors and minors who do not take BIOL 411 — Integrated Vertebrate Anatomy and Physiology I. Three lectures and four hours of laboratory per week.
Prerequisite: BIOL 101 — General Biology or BIOL 121 — Vertebrate Biology

BIOL 309 — Ornithology, 1.0 credit. E1.

A study of the form and function of birds, their identification, life history and adaptations. Two lectures and four hours of laboratory per week.
Prerequisites: BIOL 121 — Vertebrate Biology, BIOL 122 — Evolution and Diversity, BIOL 221 — Ecology, and BIOL 222 — Genetics and Molecular Biology

BIOL 311 — Entomology, 1.0 credit. E1.
Introduction to insects and their ecology, their interaction with people via medical and veterinarian entomology, as well as forensic entomology, and the role insects have played in human history. Two lectures and four hours of laboratory per week.
Prerequisites: BIOL 121 — Vertebrate Biology, BIOL 122 — Evolution and Diversity, BIOL 221 — Ecology, and BIOL 222 — Genetics and Molecular Biology

BIOL 313 — Plant Taxonomy, 1.0 credit. A1 (2007-2008).
Identification, nomenclature, and classification of vascular plants. Six hours of lecture and laboratory per week.
Prerequisites: BIOL 121 — Vertebrate Biology, BIOL 122 — Evolution and Diversity, BIOL 221 — Ecology and BIOL 224 — Plant Biology

BIOL 315 — Evolution: An Interdisciplinary Approach, 1.0 credit. E1.
This course examines modern evolutionary theory, the historical development of evolutionary thought, and the presuppositions and methodologies of different “ways of knowing” the world (e.g. science and religion). This course satisfies the integration requirement for graduation but does not count toward the biology major or minor.
Recommended as background: one course in biology

BIOL 324 — Invertebrate Zoology, 1.0 credit. A2 (2008-2009).
Comparative study of representative phyla of invertebrata, with emphasis placed on morphology, embryology, life cycles and evolutionary relationships. Two lectures and four hours of laboratory per week.
Prerequisites: BIOL 121 — Vertebrate Biology, BIOL 122 — Evolution and Diversity, BIOL 221 — Ecology, and BIOL 222 — Genetics and Molecular Biology

BIOL 336 — Histology, 1.0 credit. E1.
A microscopic study of tissues and organs of vertebrates, with special reference to humans. Three lectures and four hours of laboratory per week. Lab includes introduction to basic histotechnique and digital photomicroscopy.
Prerequisites: BIOL 121 — Vertebrate Biology, BIOL 122 — Evolution and Diversity, BIOL 221 — Ecology, and BIOL 222 — Genetics and Molecular Biology

BIOL 345 — Molecular Biology, 1.0 credit. E1.
A study of the structure, function, and regulation of genetic material at the molecular level. The techniques and applications of recombinant DNA technology are also covered. Three lectures and four hours of laboratory per week.
Prerequisites: BIOL 121 — Vertebrate Biology, BIOL 122 — Evolution and Diversity, and CHEM 127-128 — General Chemistry I and II

BIOL 352 — Immunology and Parasitology, 1.0 credit. E2.

An in-depth study of the human immune system and its regulation. The mechanisms and actions of the humoral and cell-mediated immune systems are emphasized. A portion of the course is devoted to representative parasitic protozoa, helminthes and arthropods, with emphasis on host-parasite interactions. Three lectures and four hours of laboratory per week.
Prerequisites: BIOL 121 — Vertebrate Biology, BIOL 122 — Evolution and Diversity, BIOL 221 — Ecology, and BIOL 222 — Genetics and Molecular Biology

BIOL 380 — Special Topics, 0.5 to 1.0 credit. D.

Courses covering various topics of interest in this particular discipline are offered regularly. Contact department or program chair for more information.

BIOL 390 — Cooperative Education, 0.5 to 1.0 credit. E.

BIOL 402 — Embryology, 1.0 credit. E2.
Principles of animal development with an emphasis on the developmental anatomy of vertebrates. Two lectures and four hours of laboratory per week.
Prerequisite: BIOL 121 — Vertebrate Biology, BIOL 122 — Evolution and Diversity, BIOL 221 — Ecology, and BIOL 222 — Genetics and Molecular Biology

BIOL 405 — General Ecology, 1.0 credit. E1.

Discussion of the basic principles concerning the relationships between organisms and their environments. Two lectures and four hours of laboratory per week.
Prerequisites: BIOL 121 — Vertebrate Biology, BIOL 122 — Evolution and Diversity, BIOL 221 — Ecology, and BIOL 222 — Genetics and Molecular Biology

BIOL 407 — Microbiology, 1.0 credit. E1.
Fundamental principles and techniques of microbiology, with emphasis placed on bacteria. The role of microorganisms in relation to humans is stressed. Three lectures and four hours of laboratory per week.
Prerequisite: BIOL 121 — Vertebrate Biology

BIOL 409 — Limnology, 1.0 credit. A1 (2008-2009).
The scientific study of physical, chemical and biological conditions in freshwater ecosystems. Three lectures and four hours of laboratory per week.
Prerequisites: BIOL 121 — Vertebrate Biology, BIOL 122 — Evolution and Diversity, BIOL 221 — Ecology, and BIOL 222 — Genetics and Molecular Biology

BIOL 411-412 — Integrated Vertebrate Anatomy and Physiology I and II, 1.0 credit each. E1-E2.
Together these two courses focus on structures and functions of vertebrate organ systems, with primary emphasis on mammals. Included is study of skeletal, muscle, nervous, endocrine, circulatory, respiratory, renal, digestive and reproductive systems, with
emphasis on normal homeostatic mechanisms and pathophysiology. Laboratory study includes dissection of the human body, small animal surgery and selected physiological studies. Two lecture sessions and four hours of laboratory per week.
Prerequisites for BIOL 411: BIOL 121 — Vertebrate Biology, BIOL 122 — Evolution and Diversity, BIOL 221 — Ecology, and BIOL 222 — Genetics and Molecular Biology.
Recommended: CHEM 341 — Organic Chemistry I.
Prerequisite for BIOL 412: BIOL 411


BIOL 415 — Genetics, 1.0 credit. E2.
A study of the principles of inheritance in plants and animals, complemented by experiments with living organisms in the laboratory. Human abnormalities and genetic- related diseases are included. Three lectures and four hours of laboratory per week.
Prerequisites: BIOL 121 — Vertebrate Biology and General CHEM 128 — Chemistry II or CHEM 142 — Survey of Organic and Biochemistry.
Recommended as background: CHEM 341 — Organic Chemistry I


BIOL 480 — Independent Study, 0.5 to 1.0 credit. E.
This course  provides an opportunity for individual students to conduct in-depth research of a particular topic under the direct supervision of a faculty member. Contact the department or program chair for more information.

BIOL 490 — Directed Research, 0.5 to 1.0 credit. E.
Individualized supervision of advanced research in a specific area of biology. Majors and minors may register by permission.